Back Matter

Back Matter

Author(s):
International Monetary Fund
Published Date:
June 2000
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Notes and sources

The world by region

East Asia and the Pacific

American Samoa

Cambodia

China

Fiji

Indonesia

Kiribati

Korea, Dem, Rep.

Korea, Rep.

Lao PDR

Malaysia

Marshall Islands

Micronesia, Fed. Sts.

Mongolia

Myanmar

Palau

Papua New Guinea

Philippines

Samoa

Solomon islands

Thailand

Tonga

Vanuatu

Vietnam

Europe and Central Asia

Albania

Armenia

Azerbaijan

Belarus

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Bulgaria

Croatia

Czech Republic

Estonia

Georgia

Hungary

Isle of Man

Kazakhstan

Kyrgyz Republic

Latvia

Lithuania

Macedonia, FYR

Moldova

Poland

Romania

Russian Federation

Slovak Republic

Tajikistan

Turkey

Turkmenistan

Ukraine

Uzbekistan

Yugoslavia. FR (Serbia/Montenegro)

Latin America and the Caribbean

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Barbados

Belize

Bolivia

Brazil

Chile

Colombia

Costa Rica

Cuba

Dominica

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

El Salvador

Grenada

Guatemala

Guyana

Haiti

Honduras

Jamaica

Mexico

Nicaragua

Panama

Paraguay

Peru

Puerto Rico St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia

St. Vincent and the Grenadines

Suriname

Trinidad and Tobago

Uruguay

Venezuela, RB

Middle East and North Africa

Bahrain

Djibouti

Egypt, Arab Rep.

Iran, Islamic Rep.

Iraq

Jordan

Lebanon

Libya

Morocco

Oman

Saudi Arabia

Syrian Arab

Republic Tunisia

West Bank and Gaza

Yemen. Rep.

South Asia

Afghanistan

Bangladesh

Bhutan

India

Maldives

Nepal

Pakistan

Sri Lanka

Sub-Saharan Africa

Angola

Benin

Botswana

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cameroon

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Comoros

Congo, Dem. Rep.

Congo, Rep

Cote d’Ivolre

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Ethiopia

Gabon

Gambia, The

Ghana

Guinea

Guinea-Bissau

Kenya

Lesotho

Liberia

Madagascar

Malawi

Mali

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mayotte

Mozambique

Namibia

Niger

Nigeria

Rwanda

Sao Tome and Principe

Senegal

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Somalia

South Africa

Sudan

Swaziland

Tanzania

Togo

Uganda

Zambia

Zimbabwe

High Income

Andorra

Aruba

Australia

Austria

Bahamas, The

Belgium

Bermuda

Brunei

Canada

Cayman Islands

Channel Islands

Cyprus

Denmark

Faeroe islands

Finland

France

French Polynesia

Germany

Greece

Greenland

Guam

Hong Kong. China

Iceland

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Japan

Kuwait

Liechtenstein

Luxembourg

Macao, China

Malta

Monaco

Netherlands

Netherlands Antilles

New Caledonia

New Zealand

Northern Mariana

Islands

Norway

Portugal

Qatar

Singapore

Slovenia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

United States

Virgin Islands (U.S.)

Members of the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) are shown in italics.

More information

Regional definitions

The regional groupings in this report are based on geographic and cultural affinities and the average income of residents. Developing countries and territories are divided into six regions, in some instances, broader aggregates, roughly corresponding to continental areas, are used. Countries or territories with gross national product per capita of more than $9,360 in 199S are considered to be high income and are treated as a single group. The term country does not imply political independence or official recognition but refers to any territory for which authorities report separate social or economic statistics.

Data sources

The statistics in this report were provided by various international agencies, which compiled or estimated them on the basis of reports from national authorities. They are the best available today. But the picture they portray is flawed because for some countries the data are incomplete, unreliable or unavailable. Recognising this, Paris21—a consortium of partner countries. International organisations and donors brought together under the banner Partnership in Statistics for development In the 21st Century—is workinging tc Improve the capacity of countries to produce good statistics. For more information on the Paris21 programme, see http://www.paris21.org.

The notes below Identify the principal sources for A Better Wortd for All. For definitions, bibliographic information and additional sources of data please go to the Better World Website: http://www.paris21.org/betterworld.

Poverty Estimates of the number of people living in extreme poverty are from the World Bank. Data on malnutrition among children under-5 are from the Subcommittee on Nutrition of the UN Administrative Committee on Co-ordination.

Education Primary school enrolments and projections of school-age children are from the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Institute of Statistics.

Gender Data on primary and secondary school enrolments by gender are from the UNESCO Institute of Statistics. The estimates of gender gaps by family assets are based on work by the World Bank.

Infant and child mortality Mortality rates come from the United Nations Population Division and united Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). The distribution of under-5 mortality rates by family assets is based on an analysis of Demographic and Health Surveys by the World Bank and Macro International, The analysis of under-5 mortality rates by mother’s level of education is from a study by Macro International.

Matemal mortality Data on births attended by skilled health personnel and maternal mortality ratios are preliminary estimates from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and UNICEF.

Reproductive health Estimates of contraceptive prevalence rates and fertility rates for women aged 15-19 are from the United Nations Population Division. Data on HIV Infections and deaths from AIDS come from the WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

Environment Estimates of the population with access to an improved water source are from the report of the Secretary General to the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development (May 2000). Estimates of current and potential forest areas are from the World Wide Fund for Nature. Energy use per unit of GDP was estimated by the world Bank using data from the International Energy Agency, Data on carbon dioxide emissions come from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

Wnatil will take to achieve the goats Estimates of the number of countries with democratic governments are from the World Bank’s World Development Report 1999/2000. Data on the number of counties ratifying human rights treaties were compiled by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Shares of government budgets spent on basic social services were estimated by UNICEF and UNDP. The value of merchandise trade Is from the World Trade Organisation, The number of personal computers per capita was estimated from data provided by the International Telecommunication Union. Data on tax revenues are from the International Monetary Fund’s Government Finance Statistics. Data on aid and private capital flows are from the OECD.

Other sources

Quotations throughout the report were taken from Voices of the Poor, volumes 1 and 2. published by the World Bank, and from reports by development workers around the world.

The accounts of successful programmes to reduce poverty and meet the international development goals are from reports by participants at the Forum on Development Progress held in Paris in March 2000. Additional information comes from reports by the World Bank and United Nations agencies.

Indicators for the international development
Table. Estonia: Macroeconomic Scenarios, 2000-2002 (In percent of GDP; unless otherwise indicated)
GoalsIndicators
Economic well-beingReducing extreme poverty

The proportion of people living in extreme poverty in developing countries should be reduced by at least one-half between 1990 and 2015.
Incidence of extreme poverty: people living on less than $1 a day Poverty gap ratio: incidence times depth of poverty Inequality: poorest fifth’s share of national consumption Child malnutrition: proportion of children under 5 who are underweight
Social developmentUniversal primary education

There should be universal primary education in all countries by 2015.
Net enrolment in primary education Completion of 4th grade of primary education Literacy rate of 15 to 24 year-olds
Gender equality

Progress towards gender equality and the empowerment of women should be demonstrated by eliminating gender disparity in primary and secondary education by 2005.
Ratio of girls to boys in primary and secondary education Ratio of literate females to males (15 to 24 year-olds)
Reducing Infant and child mortality

The death rates for infants and children under the age of five years should be reduced in each developing country by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015.
Infant mortality rate Under-5 mortality rate
Reducing maternal mortality

The rate of maternal mortality should be reduced by three-quarters between 1990 and 2015.
Maternal mortality ratio Births attended by skilled health personnel
Reproductive health

Access should be available through the primary healthcare system to reproductive health services for all individuals of appropriate ages, no later than 2015.
Contraceptive prevalence rate HIV prevalence in 15 to 24 year-old pregnant women
Environmental sustain ability and regenerationEnvironment

There should be a current national strategy for sustainable development, in the process of implementation, in every country by 2005. so as to ensure that current trends in the loss of environmental resources are effectively reversed at both global and national levels by 2015.
Countries with effective processes for sustainable development Population with access to an improved water source Forest area as a percentage of national surface area Biodiversity: protected land area Energy efficiency: GDP per unit of energy use Carbon dioxide emissions per capita

More information about these goals and indicators can be found at http://www.oecd.org/dac/indicators. For a broader set of goals and indicators used by the United Nations in Its common country assessments, see http://www.cca-undaf.org.

Data for the international development goals and related indicators are available from the World Bank at

http://www.worldbank.org/data. The International Monetary Fund provides links to national data sources and information on data quality and standards through its Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board: http://dsbb.imf.org.

The goals for international development address that most compelling of human desires—a world free of poverty and free of the misery that poverty breeds. This report focuses on seven goals, which, if achieved in the next 15 years, will improve the lives of millions of people. In words and pictures, with numbers and charts, it describes progress towards the goals, what has been achieved and the effort required to reach them.

International Monetary Fund

http://www.imf.org

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

http://www.oocd.org

United Nations

http://www.un.org

World Bank Group

http://www.worldbank.org

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